Oswald Jacoby

December 1, 2020 at 3:14 am

Oswald Jacoby About Oswald Jacoby

Oswald “Ozzie” “Jake” Jacoby was one of Americas most remarkable and most renowned card players in the 20th century. He was born in 1902 in Brooklyn New York and was a mathematical genius by all accounts. When he was 15, he lied about his age to join the army during WW1. Luckily he never saw much action and spent the last two months of the war playing poker.

After the war he enrolled at the Columbia University which he funded with his poker winnings. He became known for his genius in games when he beat the US champion, Frank Marshall, in a chess match. Once he earned his actuary license, he dropped out of University and started working as one of the youngest actuaries in New York History.

Jacoby’s Career

Oswald Jacoby was not only an expert in Bridge and Chess but also in Poker, Gin, Rummy, Canasta, Backgammon and Checkers. Furthermore, he wrote books about all of these games. He won multiple national titles during the 1930s and wrote a nationally syndicated bridge column for 34 years writing over 10 000 newspaper articles purely about Bridge. He also invented bidding conventions which are still popular today, and they are the Jacoby transfer and Jacoby 2NT bids.

In 1970 and 1971 he captained the North American and US teams that won the Bermuda Bowl. During his long career, he won many tournaments with various partners, including his son and wife of more than 50 years, His final tournament victory was at the ACBL late in 1983. He died from cancer in 1984, but Jacoby was posthumously made one of the founding members of the ACBL Hall of Fame in 1995. It is in this Hall of Fame that his masterful, and genius legacy lives on.

Nothing Else Matters

November 22, 2020 at 4:32 am

Nothing Else Matters

John Montagu

October 15, 2020 at 3:15 am

John Montagu Accomplished Gambler and Nobleman

John Montagu was not your usual professional gambler. He accomplished many great things as the 4th Earl of Sandwich. He negotiated treaties, sponsored a voyage through the Pacific and served as a captain of a regiment.

This extraordinary man was born in Cheswick in November 1718 and lost his father at the early age of 4. His mother got remarried, leaving him to be raised by his Grandmother and rarely seeing his mother. As a way to deal with the stress of his duties, he turned to gambling for comfort. His love for cards saw him spend endless hours around card tables, winning and losing thousands of pounds regularly.

The Impact of Gambling

Montagu first started gambling when in College. He was encouraged by his friends to join them at Horse Races, and when it came to this form of gambling, Montagu was too cautious.

As the years passed, he stopped betting on horses and started focusing on card games instead. He would spend hour’s playing cards, and his longest stint lasted 24 hours. He enjoyed convenience when eating during card games and would often ask his servants for pieces of meat between two slices of bread. He wanted this so he could hold the sandwich in one hand while holding cards in the other. Hence the birth of the sandwich because those who played against him started asking for “the same as sandwich.”

Know when to Quit

Once Montagu started playing cards, he did not know when to quit and would often lose thousands of pounds in one night. He, however, did enjoy a winning streak that paid for Captain Cook’s voyage through the Pacific Ocean where he discovered Australia and small islands, which he named The Sandwich Islands which are today known as the islands of Hawaii.

Montagu eventually depleted his savings due to his gambling habits, and when he passed away in April 1792 he was broke.

Do It

September 21, 2020 at 4:31 am

Do It